Multiple Exposures

I tried something new (for me) on this shot.  I set my Nikon D810 to  a two second delay (tripod), to then to multiple exposure mode…10 exposures.  The idea was to simulate what I’d get by using an ND filter to blur the water.  I thought the effect was interesting.  I didn’t get the same sort of blur I’d get with an ND filter, but rather more texture in the water…almost “bumpy”.  The image was processed with NIK software to improve contrast (Pro Contrast filter), and add a Sunlight filter effect.  Buy the way, the river really was yellow against the white snow due to minerals in the water.  Click to enlarge.

Creating Art

My last post was on the importance of story telling in photography. This one takes that theme and asks what is art?  I believe the two are related. 

Occasionally I’ll take a topic for a workshop then push myself to come up with content.  That may sound backward, but I’ve found that it helps me get in and study topics in more detail. My latest workshop for next month is “Creating Art”. Late last year I did a basic session on getting to know your camera and getting technically great shots. This workshop is about moving beyond technical perfection. 

As I’ve read and thought about the current  topic I’ve distilled it down to the simple statement that visual art is about creating an emotional reaction in the viewer.  Webster defines art as, “something that is created with imagination and skill and that is beautiful or that expresses important ideas or feelings”. While true, there is a lot of redundancy in that statement. Imagination and skill are givens. The artist without imagination and skill will rarely elicit the emotional response he or she desires, except by accident. Beauty is one form that elicits an emotional response. There is art though that does not rely on traditional forms of beauty. I would argue strongly that a lot of journalistic photography, done well, is art. The core of the definition is that true art MUST express and cause the viewer to experience feeling and ideas. 

How does this tie in with my previous post on story telling?  The story behind the picture is it’s message. What is it telling us? How does that make us feel?  Stories are not simple narratives with beginnings and endings. They’re descriptors “about” something, not “of” something. For example a landscape photo “of” mountains, should be “about”more than mountains if it is to rise to the level of art.  If the photographer doesn’t feel anything taking that picture of mountains, then it will turn out to be a simple “snapshot” of mountains.  If the photographer is awed by the experience and consciously attempts to communicate that feeling in the image, he or she stands a much better chance of creating art from that image.  The bottom line is, as a photographer, allow yourself to feel something, and make a conscious choice to express that feeling in your work.  That doesn’t guarantee you’ll produce art, but not doing that guarantees you’ll fail.

Story Telling

What is that special quality in an image that makes the viewer look more than once? Why is it that some images demand more attention, while others don’t.  Both may be beautiful, visually.  Both may have an interesting subject, but the image that stands out goes beyond all that; it makes you feel something.  It tells you a story about the subject.  That story may or may not be exactly as intended by the photographer, but it’s there.  

Whether we know it or not, if we work at our craft long enough, and take it seriously, we usually end up developing a certain “style” and set of favorite subjects. Certain subjects capture our  imagination.  We frame them in a certain way, and we process them in certain ways.  What drives us is that inner need to tell the subject’s story, and tell our own story though that capture. We want to convey that feeling that drew us to take the image.  When we get back home and begin processing the image we recrop, lighten and darken, and do our best to bring out that story. 

Excellence in photography comes from being self-aware enough to understand this process of story telling.  Think about your best images.  What do they say? When you stop to capture an image, what is it about that subject that made you look? How can you capture that aspect of the image? When you process the image, what can you do to help the viewer see and feel what you saw and felt? To  do less than that is to take “snapshots”; brainless, thoughtless, images with no feeling…no story.

Try this exercise.  When you post and share your images, give them a name; not a name describing the subject, a name describing the story.  Instead of naming a scene “Yosemite Valley”, name it something like “Where the earth meets the sky”.  I know for myself, I love landscapes and have great awe and respect for nature’s majesty and power.  I strive to have my images convey this quality.  Give it a try…name your images. 

Yellowstone Trip

2017-01--719Helen and I joined the Kingwood Photo Club group for a trip to Yellowstone in mid-January.  For a couple of warm weather people, this was a huge step.  We read about surviving in cold weather and planned clothing for months. Reading up on how to stay warm at -20 degrees, and finding cold weather bargains consumed us for months before the trip. We didn’t want a bunch of expensive clothing that we’d use only once.  Then of course came the camera equipment, and getting all that clothing and gear packed into a reasonably sized suitcase.  We surprised ourselves.  We were able to go for a week with one suitcase between us, and my camera case/backpack….and we survived.  In fact we enjoyed it tremendously.  It was cold, but somehow we managed to make the right clothing and photo gear choices.  Great trip.

In my bag:  

  • Two Camera bodies
    • Nikon D7000
    • Nikon D810
  • Nikon 70-200, f/2.8 lens
  • Nikon 16-35, f/4 lens
  • Nikon 2x Teleconverter
  • Tripod, Monfrotto, Aluminum with ball head
  • Assorted cleaning gear, rocket blaster, etc
  • Two chargers, 4 batteries
  • WD MyPassport wireless pro 2 TB hard drive for backup
  • Ipad Pro 128MB, for additional backup and editing/sharing on the road
  • 2, Circular polarizers and 2, 4 stop ND filters

Helen’s equipment:  Helen got a new camera for the trip, and it worked out very well.  Many of the pictures in this gallery were taken with the Sony.

  • Sony A6000 mirrorless camera with two kit lenses
    • 18-50mm lens
    • 55-205mm telephoto
    • Charger and extra battery

Connecting my Website to my FB Page

I work with a number of websites so I like to stay up with functionality like integrating social networks with websites. Write one post, and have it show up in locations where others can see it.  To be clear, this is nothing new, but I’ve not found any reason to use it for the sites I developed.  I use my own site a a platform to learn.  With a little time on my hands, I thought I’d try this out. This post is my first attempt at this connection. 

Printing My Images

I, like most of us (I think), believe the printed image is the epitome of the photographer’s art. Probably, again like most of us, I print very few of my pictures with social media being the primary means of sharing.  When you think of it, this is crazy.  I shoot with a 36 megapixel camera, and post at 75dpi, on Facebook.  I could easily be shooting with an iPhone and do just as well! Well I decided to try to print more images, and have spent several days culling my library to find candidates.  One thing I found is that the ones that might look interesting in print are not necessarily the same as what I previously considered my “best” pictures.  Sure there is overlap, but when I try to envision the print, many of my previously favorite images look like they wouldn’t really stand out.  This really is a difficult sorting process!  So here is my current “possibles” list. (Click image)

Mountain line

Getting Ready for a Photo Trip

With a mid-winter photo trip to Yellowstone scheduled, I’ve been trying to get new gear ready, trying to figure out how to carry it, and making sure everything works along with backups…redundancy without getting silly. I’ve lived in the good warm south all my life, and this will be my first Winter shoot.  It’s probably not something I’ll do frequently, but I’m really looking forward to the experience, in spite of my warm blooded hate of cold weather. 

Most of my photography is landscape, or city/architectural. I do very little wildlife. You can’t go to Yellowstone in winter and not do wildlife.  Since my longest lens is a 70-200mm I bought a 2x teleconverter. I didn’t want to spring for another expensive lens that I may never use again.  I also didn’t really want a huge telephoto zoom that would be impractical for my landscape hiking. The teleconverter is small and light and fits in nicely in the backpack.  If I use that 70-200 lens with the teleconverter on a crop lens camera I figure I can get as much as 600mm (equivalent). 

Here’s a shot taken with that set up, using a monopod…essentially handheld  

My plan is to fit all this gear into my backpack, and carry a tripod separately. 

  • Nikon D810 
  • Nikon D7000 (backup)
  • Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8
  • Nikon 16-35mm f/4
  • Sigma 28-300 (my “do everything” lens), used primarily with the D7000
  • Nikon 2x teleconverter
  • two circular polorizers 
  • two 4 stop ND filters
  • a Yongnuo speed light 
  • iPad Pro – used for backup and field editing
  • WD wireless pro hard drive – backup drive
  • Two Remote shutter releases – one for each camera
  • two battery chargers, and four batteries. I’ll need to recharge several batteries each night in the cold weather. 

My wife is taking her own camera, as Sony A6000 with two lenses. Small but powerful (my wife)

Clothing is another whole story. Living in Houston I’m not used to even thinking of anything like -35f, which is what it was today.  Maybe by the time I go, it’ll be warmer..we can hope.  Well there is still time before the trip to think about this a little more. I’ve “test packed” and was able to get it all in one small roller board suitcase. Very full, but do-able.